29th January

News and Features
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Here’s one reason (among a raft of them) why the cloistered Oxford boffin has his sums wrong:

Such is the nature of the 100 year rule, details of events that happened when our grandparents were in their 20s will only be fully known when our grandchildren are in their 20s.
Historic files still closed under the 100 year rule

If you don’t believe the era of the cyborg is upon us, you haven’t been watching the news this week. An Australian firm announced it will begin human testing of a fully implantable bionic eye, a Canadian inventor became a DIY Iron Man when he demonstrated his homemade exoskeleton and we got an update from an eyeborg who has a camera hidden in his fake eye.
Bionic Eye, Exoskeleton Guy and Eye Socket Spy

 

A new type of lens was recently discovered that can detect invisible entities around military installations and industrial sites.
This new lens, discovered by Thunder Energies Corp., is concave and has the ability to detect antimatter, including invisible entities.
New Lens Detects Invisible Entities
Good if it works. Something Harry Oldfield‘s been working on for years too. ‘Invisible entities’ are everywhere. Not sure why Santilli claims ‘“Those entities appear to conduct unauthorized surveillance of rather sensitive civilian, industrial, and military installations.”

 

A short video I put together showing ‘invisible entities that aren’t hanging around such localities:

 

Reincarnation. We all have a pretty general idea of what it is. It is thought that reincarnation means that one comes back as another person after he or she dies. In some religions, who or what you come back as is based on past actions in a previous life, but that isn’t always the case.
3-Year-Old Boy Remembers Details of His Death, Locates His Killer, Body and Murder Weapon

 


Abstract
Physiological effects have been observed in a human subject in response to stimulation of the skin with weak electromagnetic fields that are pulsed with certain frequencies near ½ Hz or 2.4 Hz, such as to excite a sensory resonance. Many computer monitors and TV tubes, when displaying pulsed images, emit pulsed electromagnetic fields of sufficient amplitudes to cause such excitation. It is therefore possible to manipulate the nervous system of a subject by pulsing images displayed on a nearby computer monitor or TV set. For the latter, the image pulsing may be imbedded in the program material, or it may be overlaid by modulating a video stream, either as an RF signal or as a video signal. The image displayed on a computer monitor may be pulsed effectively by a simple computer program. For certain monitors, pulsed electromagnetic fields capable of exciting sensory resonances in nearby subjects may be generated even as the displayed images are pulsed with subliminal intensity.
Nervous system manipulation by electromagnetic fields from monitors US 6506148 B2

 

 

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